WAR WITH ISIS: MULTIPLEXING A NEW WORLD ORDER, by Tom Mysiewicz

This is an entertaining read and a rather fresh approach to the whole ISIS situation.

We would like to point out to the readers that this piece has been queued for publication for some time and in that space one of Tom’s predictions regarding forces being deployed due to the “Ebola outbreak” has materialized.

Tom is a shrewd observer,analyst and opinion maker. Read more from behind the lines,behind the editorials abound and ponder on the wider game.

AE


President Obama’s speech announcing war with ISIS  has been hailed in the non-mainstream press as a harbinger of war with Syria,  paving the way for an assault on Lebanon and Iran.  (I would add to that mix the creation of what I call “Israeli Kurdistan” from Iraq and a portion of Turkey[i], dispossession of Palestinians and expulsion of Gaza residents into the Sinai and further expansion of Eretz or greater Israel as the future seat of AngloZionist world government.[ii])

The more farsighted see in Obama’s war announcement and in the ISIS Caliph’s almost simultaneous threats to attack Russia an even more sinister motive of reinstating the Reagan-era mujahedeen and Bush-Clinton-era Chechen state-sponsored terrorism against the former Soviet Union and then Russia.  (Not surprisingly, Saudi Arabia, which was heavily involved in funding and proselytizing both of the aforementioned terrorist enterprises, was similarly involved in the creation of ISIS/ISIL.)

While no one has mentioned it, the sheer blatant nature of Mr. Obama’s call for an illegal aggressive war on Syria—without Congressional approval (especially after the 2013 Russian-brokered Syrian peace deal) can be seen as a bare-faced provocation.  One rubber stamped by Vice President Kerry.  Could the Russians be persuaded to make a bad chess move, sacrificing either Syria or Ukraine?

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Putin, by Sharon Tennison

Friends and colleagues,

As the Ukraine situation has worsened, unconscionable misinformation and hype is being poured on Russia and Vladimir Putin.

Journalists and pundits must scour the Internet and thesauruses to come up with fiendish new epithets to describe both.

Wherever I make presentations across America, the first question ominously asked during Q&A is always,  “What about Putin?”

It’s time to share my thoughts which follow:

Putin obviously has his faults and makes mistakes.  Based on my earlier experience with him, and the experiences of trusted people, including U.S. officials who have worked closely with him over a period of years, Putin most likely is a straight, reliable and exceptionally inventive man. He is obviously a long-term thinker and planner and has proven to be an excellent analyst and strategist. He is a leader who can quietly work toward his goals under mounds of accusations and myths that have been steadily leveled at him since he became Russia’s second president.

I’ve stood by silently watching the demonization of Putin grow since it began in the early 2000s –– I pondered on computer my thoughts and concerns, hoping eventually to include them in a book (which was published in 2011). The book explains my observations more thoroughly than this article. Like others who have had direct experience with this little known man, I’ve tried to no avail to avoid being labeled a “Putin apologist”.  If one is even neutral about him, they are considered “soft on Putin” by pundits, news hounds and average citizens who get their news from CNN, Fox and MSNBC.

I don’t pretend to be an expert, just a program developer in the USSR and Russia for the past 30 years.  But during this time, I’ve have had far more direct, on-ground contact with Russians of all stripes across 11 time zones than any of the Western reporters or for that matter any of Washington’s officials.  I’ve been in country long enough to ponder Russian history and culture deeply, to study their psychology and conditioning, and to understand the marked differences between American and Russian mentalities which so complicate our political relations with their leaders.  As with personalities in a family or a civic club or in a city hall, it takes understanding and compromise to be able to create workable relationships when basic conditionings are different.  Washington has been notoriously disinterested in understanding these differences and attempting to meet Russia halfway.

In addition to my personal experience with Putin, I’ve had discussions with numerous American officials and U.S. businessmen who have had years of experience working with him––I believe it is safe to say that none would describe him as “brutal” or “thuggish”, or the other slanderous adjectives and nouns that are repeatedly used in western media.

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