The Anti-Empire Report #133, by William Blum

The Islamist State

You can’t believe a word the United States or its mainstream media say about the current conflict involving The Islamic State (ISIS).

You can’t believe a word France or the United Kingdom say about ISIS.

You can’t believe a word Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait, Jordan, or the United Arab Emirates say about ISIS. Can you say for sure which side of the conflict any of these mideast countries actually finances, arms, or trains, if in fact it’s only one side? Why do they allow their angry young men to join Islamic extremists? Why has NATO-member Turkey allowed so many Islamic extremists to cross into Syria? Is Turkey more concerned with wiping out the Islamic State or the Kurds under siege by ISIS? Are these countries, or the Western powers, more concerned with overthrowing ISIS or overthrowing the Syrian government of Bashar al-Assad?

You can’t believe the so-called “moderate” Syrian rebels. You can’t even believe that they are moderate. They have their hands in everything, and everyone has their hands in them.

Iran, Hezbollah and Syria have been fighting ISIS or its precursors for years, but the United States refuses to join forces with any of these entities in the struggle. Nor does Washington impose sanctions on any country for supporting ISIS as it quickly did against Russia for its alleged role in Ukraine.

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Will Serbia Turn to the East? , by Joaquin Flores

The Real Significance of Putin’s Visit

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Serbian President Tomislav Nikolic walk during a welcome ceremony at the airport in Belgrade, Serbia, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. (RIA-Novosti / Alexei Nikolsky) / click to expand
Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Serbian President Tomislav Nikolic walk during a welcome ceremony at the airport in Belgrade, Serbia, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. (RIA-Novosti / Alexei Nikolsky) / click to expand

[C]heered by tens of thousands of citizens, columns of Serbian tanks, armored cars, and thousands of infantry men paraded down Nikola Tesla Boulevard, Thursday, in New Belgrade.  The parade’s destination was the Palace of Serbia, where international leaders, dignitaries and high ranking generals of foreign militaries stood in bleachers to look on.  Among them, most importantly, was Russian President Vladimir Putin.  In a ceremonial event surrounding this occasion, he was awarded the Order of the Republic of Serbia, the nation’s highest honor [1].

Today marked the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Belgrade from occupying Nazi forces. A few of the remaining WWII veterans also stood in the dignitaries section, to remember fallen comrades in the great anti-fascist war of liberation.

The event was not just one commemorative, it was in its own right quite historic.  For one, it was the first Serbian military parade since 1918, and the first military parade in Serbia since 1985, when it was the core republic of the Socijalistička Federativna Republika Jugoslavija (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, or SFRY).   A “Strizhi” air show of Russian MiG fighters over the Belgrade skies captivated the audience below, while Serbian armoured personnel carriers crawled in formation to the WWII partisan march, Po Šumama i Gorama  (“In the Forests and Mountains”)

But the event’s significance was greater—much greater than a historical reflection and national celebration of a great victory of its people over the most powerful, aggressive, war machine in Europe at the time.  This event’s significance went beyond being just a display of national resolve and remembrance.  It was symbolic of a turn that Serbia was taking in the direction of its historic ally, Russia.  With Putin as honored guest, Serbia seemed to be announcing a new course forward, while overtly and unashamedly celebrating the past.

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Kobani : An alternative to western neoliberalism

This is ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL READING to understand the people power/direct democracy experiment going on in Kobani. It’s Murray Bookchin adapted to Kurdistan. No wonder NO ONE – not to mention the hyper power – want this to succeed. And The Caliph just wants to kill them all.

Kobani – and Rojava as a whole – is pointing the way towards a REAL VIABLE ALTERNATIVE to the current valley of tears: financialization/turbo-capitalism supported by neoliberal ideology.

Scroll down to the “face-to-face democracy” section; that’s approximately what’s goin’ on in Kobani and Rojava as a whole.

Capture

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Re-elected Dilma wins in a Brazil broken in two,by Pepe Escobar

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Re-elected Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff waves following her win, in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. (AFP Photo / Evaristo Sa)

President Dilma Rousseff of the ruling Worker’s Party (PT) was re-elected this Sunday in a tight run-off against opposition candidate Aecio Neves of the Social Democracy Party of Brazil (PSDB).

Sun, sex, samba, carnival and at least until the recent World Cup hammering by Germany, the “land of football.” And don’t forget “vibrant democracy.” Even as it enjoys one of the highest soft power quotients around the world, Brazil remains submerged by clichés.

“Vibrant democracy” certainly lived up to its billing in this hard-fought presidential election. Yet another cliché would rule this was the victory of “state-centric” policies against “structural reforms.” Or the victory of “high social spending” against a “pro-business” approach – which implies business as the privileged enemy of social equality.

Exit clichés. Enter a cherished national motto: ‘Brazil is not for beginners.’

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Freest Under Czech Communism!, by André Vltchek

12

Milan Kohout is a thinker, performer, and professor. He was born in Czechoslovakia, where he lived before signing of ‘Charter 77’, and immigrating to the United States, where he became a naturalized US citizen. Mr. Kohout got thoroughly disappointed with capitalism, and the Western regime.

For years and decades he has been performing all over the world, confronting Western imperialism, racism, capitalism and all the world’s religions, particularly Christianity, frontally.

The Discussion took place on October 12, 2014, in Klikarov, a small village in West Bohemia. Vltchek came to Czech Republic in order to give a political lecture at the Faculty of Philosophy and Arts in the city of Pilsen, where Kohout teaches. Both of them drove to a tiny and remote village of Klikarov, in West Bohemia, where they sat by a fishpond, and engaged in a discussion about toxicity of Western imperialism, capitalism and European/US propaganda.

***

ANDRE VLTCHEK (AV): You are one of the few artists in the West who is taking direct action against Western imperialism, against unbridled capitalism, and against the religions. How and when did you choose this particular form of art?

MILAN KOHOUT (ML): It is obviously from the days when I was part of the so-called ‘Second Culture’, the Czech Underground; the era that was called by the West a ‘totalitarian system’ or, the Czechoslovak socialist system. ‘Second Culture’ was the movement that shaped our own creativity as well as the meaning of art. In those days we were expelled from the official culture, or from the ‘first culture’. So we rebelled. It was a deeply political movement by definition, and it produced political art.

AV: You often say, very correctly, that those of you who signed “Charter 77”, and those of you who were involved in the underground/opposition movement during the Cold War, were actually socialists, some even Marxists. That includes you. You are definitely a left-wing intellectual. That is a clear paradox: the West was ‘selling you’, promoting you, as a group of anti-Communists. Could you talk about this paradox?

MK: There has been, of course, such a paradox, a great paradox, because most of the people from the underground movement, of the ‘second culture’, were actually deeply supportive of leftist values. Like sharing everything, instead of collecting things. We believed in the common ownership of property and the means of production. But we never thought about it from a theoretical angle – we did not realize that our values were actually leftist, philosophically. So while we were fighting against the so-called Communist government, we were actually true Communists!

Btw, when I say this to my fellow ‘Charter-77’ comrades who have never left this country, they often get very pissed off – they don’t want to admit it.

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Ebola:Pandemic or ghost of neocons past?,by Tom Mysiewicz

“Ask yourself: If Ebola really was spread from person to person, instead of controlled spread through vaccination — then WHY would the CDC and the U.S. Government continue to allow flights in and out of these countries with absolutely no regulation, or at all?”

Quote Attributed to Nana Kwame, Accra, Ghana

Foreword

In this article, I will endeavor to at least raise questions for further investigation.    For simplicity I have made extensive use of endnotes.  While mass forced inoculation of potentially dangerous vaccines and the imposition of martial law in the U.S. and NATO are certainly foreseeable long-term outcomes of the current situation, I will leave these for other commentators to speculate on.   Also, while the “pandemic” is claimed by many to be a foil for strategic occupation of resource-rich African territory by the U.S./NATO, my treatment of troop deployments only relates to (a) the reality of the epidemic/pandemic and (b) the possibility that countermeasures have been developed to allow troops to operate in a contaminated environment or that this deployment is really a large-scale clinical trial of such Ebola countermeasures.

There is little doubt in my mind that the filovirus agents causing Ebola are real and that they are (or appear to be) making a sudden and unlikely spread after 94 or so years of relative inactivity.[i]  However, many in Africa do not believe in the reality of Ebola or blame it on vaccination programs and foreign testing labs in their respective countries.[ii]  Dr. Cyril E. Broderick, a Delaware State University (DSU) associate professor has made serious allegations concerning the development of recombinant Ebola-containing strains and their testing on African populations utilizing various labs and NGOs, and alleges experiments by the U.S. DoD.[iii]  Reports have also surfaced in Liberia of water sources being poisoned with toxic substances to simulate Ebola symptoms as well as untested “Ebola vaccines” being administered to people with ill effects.[iv]

Is this pure superstition from “darkest Africa”?  There have been numerous vaccination programs in the affected regions of Africa.  (Some 100-million Africans were immunized against smallpox prior to 1972 when the disease was declared officially eradicated.  Massive campaigns by NGOs and governmental agencies have increased numbers of vaccinated (all types) individuals in the Ebola-affected areas from less than 50% in 1990 to greater than 80% in 2010.[v]  For varying historical reasons[vi] one could easily posit the existence of man-made live vaccinia smallpox vaccines incorporating key Ebola genes, potentially producing false test positives and Ebola-like symptoms, and covertly administered as part of  existing vaccination programs.[vii]

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On the Hong Kong “Occupy Central” protests

AFP_Oct3_2014_TriadGrandpas

The Western media is now throwing its full weight behind the Hong Kong “Occupy Central” protests – they’ve been featured on at least 2 of the US State Department’s TIME Magazine covers and stories like NYT’s “Stars Backing Hong Kong Protests Pay Price on Mainland” attempt to appeal to the most base emotions …

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/25/world/asia/hong-kong-stars-face-mainland-backlash-over-support-for-protests.html

Why the emotional appeal? Because rationally and logically the protests have been exposed as yet more US meddling around the globe (http://journal-neo.org/2014/10/24/hong-kong-s-umbrellas-are-made-in-usa/). If the protest has been fully exposed as foreign meddling, why shouldn’t anyone supporting it now pay a “price” on the mainland?

And it is not Beijing simply squashing these people. No one is hiring these “stars” now involved in the fake protests in Hong Kong. Ironically, all these protesters bleat about is “freedom to choose,” well businesses and labels are “choosing” to boycott people involved in the protests – and here we see the hypocrisy and fraud behind the protests – yet again.

It’s about choosing what the protesters want, not choosing what everyone genuinely wants. And of course what the protesters want is clearly what the US State Department wants – elections their well funded and backed fraudulent proxies can run in and win before carrying out US foreign policy aimed at dividing and destroying China.

China has voted, and they’ve voted “no thanks.”

Tony Cartalucci maintains the Land Destroyer Report and is an independent American geopolitical analyst based in Thailand.

Land Destroyer can be followed on Twitter here and Facebook here. Comments, questions, corrections, and article submissions should be sent to cartalucci@gmail.com, or through the Contact LD page.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Oceania Saker.

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The Kobani riddle, by Pepe Escobar

femmes-kobane

The brave women of Kobani – where Syrian Kurds are desperately fighting ISIS/ISIL/Daesh – are about to be betrayed by the “international community”. These women warriors, apart from Caliph Ibrahim’s goons, are also fighting treacherous agendas by the US, Turkey and the administration of Iraqi Kurdistan. So what’s the real deal in Kobani?

Let’s start by talking about Rojava. The full meaning of Rojava – the three mostly Kurdish provinces of northern Syria – is conveyed in this editorial (in Turkish) published by jailed activist Kenan Kirkaya. He argues that Rojava is the home of a “revolutionary model” that no less than challenges “the hegemony of the capitalist, nation-state system” – way beyond its regional “meaning for Kurds, or for Syrians or Kurdistan.”

Ain al-Arab or Kobané is a city in northern Syria, the Syrian Kurdistan currently located on the Turkish border
Ain al-Arab or Kobané is a city in northern Syria, the Syrian Kurdistan currently located on the Turkish border

Kobani – an agricultural region – happens to be at the epicenter of this non-violent experiment in democracy, made possible by an arrangement early on during the Syrian tragedy between Damascus and Rojava (you don’t go for regime change against us, we leave you alone). Here, for instance, it’s argued that “even if only a single aspect of true socialism were able to survive there, millions of discontented people would be drawn to Kobani.”

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