Poll: Should France deliver the Mistral ships to Russia?

Dear readers,

We all have been well acquainted with the western presstitute narrative on any and everything Russia. But sometimes it is fun to give a slap back, here is your chance to do that personally.

The oldest national newspaper in France, also the second-largest, is conducting a poll that is worth participating in. Of course the newspaper is mired in dirty politics, military industrial complex links and what not. There is no guarantee on impartiality as western governments now routinely employ trolls, manipulate site visits, online polls and even manufacture data. But then again that is western “journalism” in general these days.

Anyhow, take the time out and cast your vote here and pass this on !

Click below to vote if France should deliver the Mistral ships to Russia. Remember “Oui” means yes!

MistralPoll

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The great resilience of the Chinese communist state, by FRANCESCO SISCI

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The resilience of the Chinese state and of the Chinese communist government has been for decades a source of deep misunderstanding in the West. One can find the first and most striking instance of this in the 1962 Sino-Indian War. Brij Mohan Kaul tried to exploit China’s weakness: in Tibet, which in 1959 experienced a widespread uprising lasting three years; and at a difficult time, just after the massive 1960–1961 famine had shrunk the population by about 10%. Despite this, India was thrashed in the war.

The defeat was surely due to important tactical mistakes committed by the Indian army. But what is significant is that in a moment of great weakness in Tibet in particular and in China in general, the Indian attack did not start a process of societal unravelling of the kind China had seen with the 1840 Opium war. Of course the first Opium war was a defeat for China and the Indian war had been a victory, but even discounting this, the Communist power in the early 1960s seemed more solid that the imperial power a century before.

In the same year, Nationalist general Chiang Kai-shek, defeated in the civil war in 1949 and confined to Taiwan, was planning to re-conquer the Mainland. Chiang had clear intelligence about the poor state of the country in the aftermath of the great famine caused by the failures of the 1957 Great Leap Forward. Mao had been side-lined, so it looked like a golden opportunity. Yet the war with India proved the analysis wrong. This was also confirmed by the fact that Nationalist guerrillas in Amdo (the Tibetan part of Sichuan) and on the border with Yunnan did not meet with much success, and with hindsight the US was right not to back Chiang Kai-shek’s plans.

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