Witches Sabbath from Paris to Kiev, by Dagmar Henn

Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
Hover through the fog and filthy air.
(Macbeth)

We’ve already become accustomed to press reports of happenings and hearing the statements of our politicians as something seen through a camera obscura – passing them through a very small hole at first, and then looking at them upside down (which in this case nearly generates a kind of truth). But during the last few days the gyrations performed with definitions and invocations have turned so wild, moved around so incessently that it takes one’s breath away and any clear image dissappears in the whirl.

First the coalition of defenders of western values invoked these values on a street in Paris. In short succession after that came the jubulation by the hired butchers of words over the choice of the “Unword of the Year[1]“, making the whole bunch feel ennobled while the same motive used for the uplifting of the presstitutes became a completely irrelevant footnote when dealing with the brown shirted view of history presented by the Ukrainian ally. And even human compassion, although it appeared briefly on the frontpages after the Paris assault, was hurriedly sent back into hibernation, considering the continuous artillery barrage of Novorossija. It makes one long for a slow motion button, or at least a vow not to take in more than one of these twistings at a time, just to keep one’s sanity.

What a jubilation arose after the word „Lügenpresse“ (press of lies) was elected to be the „Unword of the Year”. It had been, so the the jury´s statement, „a keyword for ideological attack already during WWI and was also used by the Nazis to generally defame independent media.“ And suddenly they all felt independent, the scribbling serfs of Springer and Bertelsmann. It came about so easily.  The jury described „a general defamation on the part of the independent media, because the overwhelming majority of their representatives try to counter the intentionally incited fear of an alleged „islamisation of the Occident“ with neutral presentation of social issues and a differenciated sight.“ Deutsche Welle, all those months prematurely yearning for a status of war correspondent, built the bridge between the French community’s  western values to the choice of the „UNword“ straight away. You can only observe with stunned amazement how the inhabitants of the media trenches define themselves as „critical media“ and, after launching a continuous barrage of sheer twisted reality, still have the daring to decorate themselves with sentences like this one:

Because, what is the consequence of a term like  „press of lies“? It means that there is only one writing the truth and that is the only truth.  But the pluralism of democracy opposes this single truth.“

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What game is the House of Saud playing?, by Pepe Escobar

pepe2
Reuters / Todd Korol

The House of Saud now finds itself in times of extreme trouble. Their risky oil price war may eventually backfire. The succession of King Abdullah may turn into a bloodbath. And the American protector may be musing a change of heart.

Let’s start with oil – and some background. As much as US supply has increased by a couple of million barrels a day, enough oil from Iran, Kirkuk in Iraq, Libya and Syria has gone out of production; and that offsets extra US oil on the market. Essentially, the global economy – at least for the moment – is not searching for more oil because of European stagnation/recession and the relative China slowdown.

Since 2011, Saudi Arabia has been flooding the market to offset the decrease in Iran exports caused by the US economic war, a.k.a. sanctions. Riyadh, moreover, prevented OPEC from reducing country production quotas. The House of Saud believes it can play the waiting game – as fracked oil, mostly American, is inexorably driven out of the market because it is too expensive. After that, the Saudis believe they will regain market share.

In parallel, the House of Saud is obviously enjoying “punishing” Iran and Russia for their support of Bashar Assad in Damascus. Moreover, the House of Saud is absolutely terrified of a nuclear deal essentially between the US and Iran (although that’s still a major “if”) – leading to a long-term détente.

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Art Has to Fight for Justice, by André Vltchek

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It was 30th May, deep autumn in Argentina. The streetlights had been turned on an hour earlier, just as I was entering the house/museum. Now inside, it was dark, silent, warm and cozy.

Magda Konopacka de Bruzzone brought two cups of tea upstairs, after locking the gate. For a while, we sat in silence.

“Now tell me about the world outside,” she whispered, after I took my first sip.

“People are freezing to death,” I said. “Argentinean people are dying.”

She looked at me and then her eyes moved somewhere behind, way beyond me.

***
She was the love of his life.

To me he was one of the greatest artists of 20th century Latin America. His name was Alberto Bruzzone. Magdalena was his last wife, his muse, his model, and his companion – his everything for the last 3 decades of his life. They met when he was in his late 50’s and she was still a very young woman. They never separated. He died in 1994, here, in Mar del Plata, at the age of 87. She turned their entire house into a stunning museum and cultural center: into “Casa Bruzzone”.

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