Novorussian Armed Forces capture Ukrainian Brigade Commander

Source: Fort Russ

Commander of the 93rd “Zhitomir” Brigade, Oleg Mikats, taken prisoner at the airport.

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By Yurasumy

Translated from Russian by J.Hawk

At first he was described as a battalion commander. But it’s not so. Oleg Mikats is the commander of the 93rd Brigade. He was the third on the Right Sector party list during the recent Rada elections [he is shown in illustration above in the top row, second from the left]. So I wish to congratulate Novorossia fighters on their good catch. And I hope they realize what a big fish they caught.

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The Ukrainian exterminators were captured during an attempt to break through to the airport. Poroshenko’s advisor Biryukov tried to explain yet another defeat (“Damn you, you Russian bastards!”). But the advisor either did not know or failed to mention that one of the prisoners turned out to be Oleg Mikats, the commanding officer of the 93rd Brigade who took part in the well known meeting with Motorola and Kupol. I hope everyone understands that brigade commanders do not lead “tens of soldiers” (as Biryukov claimed) into an attack (a Ukrainian brigade has a full personnel strength of 3,000 soldiers). Is that so hard to understand? So what kind of advice is he giving Poroshenko? And what’s the value of a brigade commander who took his troops straight into captivity.

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Whiplash!, by Dmitry Orlov

Source: Club Orlov

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Over the course of 2014 the prices the world pays for crude oil have tumbled from over $125 per barrel to around $45 per barrel now, and could easily drop further before heading much higher before collapsing again before spiking again. You get the idea. In the end, the wild whipsawing of the oil market, and the even wilder whipsawing of financial markets, currencies and the rolling bankruptcies of energy companies, then the entities that financed them, then national defaults of the countries that backed these entities, will in due course cause industrial economies to collapse. And without a functioning industrial economy crude oil would be reclassified as toxic waste. But that is still two or three decades off in the future.

In the meantime, the much lower prices of oil have priced most of the producers of unconventional oil out of the market. Recall that conventional oil (the cheap-to-produce kind that comes gushing out of vertical wells drilled not too deep down into dry ground) peaked in 2005 and has been declining ever since. The production of unconventional oil, including offshore drilling, tar sands, hydrofracturing to produce shale oil and other expensive techniques, was lavishly financed in order to make up for the shortfall. But at the moment most unconventional oil costs more to produce than it can be sold for. This means that entire countries, including Venezuela’s heavy oil (which requires upgrading before it will flow), offshore production in the Gulf of Mexico (Mexico and US), Norway and Nigeria, Canadian tar sands and, of course, shale oil in the US. All of these producers are now burning money as well as much of the oil they produce, and if the low oil prices persist, will be forced to shut down.

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“Je suis Charlie” ? Or a pact with the devil and a fool’s bargain, by Paul Matthews

“Internally, French society is not “threatened” by a Muslim presence – although it is indeed threatened by exacerbated Islamophobia. The key problem is that France does not know how to integrate its Muslim population, something that allows what sociologist Farhad Khosrokhavar describes as “terroristes maison”. These made in France terrorists start as petty thieves, are de-Islamicized and then re-Islamicized by neighborhood imams and most of all by the devastation wreaked by the Empire of Chaos and NATO over the lands of Islam”. [1]
 “The conquest of Algeria by France takes place in several distinct stages of the landing of the African army in Sidi Ferruch June 14, 1830, under General de Bourmont until the formal surrender of Emir Abd el-Kader to the Duke of Aumale, on 23 December 1847. This conquest ended with the annexation of Algeria to the French Republic, through the creation of the French départements in Algeria in December 1848 “. [2]

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Illustrated by this photo of two French soldiers toying with their prey, the rape of Algeria lasted more than a century. The extreme brutality of this conquest recalls another – that of Italian Libya – a North African territory conquered by the Kingdom of Italy, after the 1911 Italian invasion of Ottoman Tripolitania. Exactly100 years later Muammar Gaddafi is put to death by forces supported by NATO. An event filmed [3] showing the Libyan being sodomised shortly before he is executed – probably on orders from Sarkozy’s secret service. [4]

People commemorate suffering. The legacy of the Algerian War of Independence brings to mind the bloodshed and bitterness on each side of the Irish Sea after centuries of colonialism going back to Anglo-Norman times.

Cherif and Said Kouachi were of Algerian descent. Something which hasn’t escaped the eagle eye of renowned British journalist Robert Fisk – fin connaisseur of the Arab world – given the spelling of their family name [5] His article retraces links between the attack by the two brothers and the French-Algerian conflict (1954-1962).

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