Je suis Vanya!

IamVanya

The Western world welcomed with open arms, an embrace and much platitude, the butcher of Kiev, Poroshenko, in Paris earlier this month.

We are to forget the thousands of men,women,children and the elderly that have been terrorized by the NATO/US/EU funded Nazi war machine in Kiev. We are not to utter the names of the dead children, remember their faces or even to protest their plight.

JeSuisVanya

How is such anti-humanism celebrated as freedom and democracy in the West?

Remember one name at least, so that you can put a face to the horrors being inflicted on Donbass by the Western equipped,funded,supported and directed Nazi war machine.

The name is Vanya.

AE

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Should Syriza’s Choose The Soft Or The Hard Path?

So Syriza won in Greece. It formed a new government in coalition with the small, rightwing Independent Greece party. Before the election Syriza announced a program that would have Greece stay in the Euro but renegotiate conditions for loans.

I hope that was a ploy. Yves Smith describes the difficulties with Syriza’s soft path:

The nut of that problem, as we will see, is that while may be a very estimable-sounding position, it may not be as pragmatic as it appears. Greece likely has better odds of winning concessions if it is less reasonable, since the Germans and the even more implacable Fins are convinced that the periphery countries are immoral beggars who deserve to be ground into the dust if they cannot or will not pay their debts. Greece is unlikely to be able to shake the perception in the North that they have the upper hand and can force Greece to heel, giving at most only fairly minor concessions.

Greece’s best hope is if it there is an upsurge in popularity of other anti-austerity and anti-Eurozone parties in the rest of Europe. And they are more likely to rally support in the rest of the Eurozone if they take bold positions rather than careful, studied ones. And even then, that may not be enough for them to resolve the deep-seated problems they face. It isn’t simply that they face a very difficult challenge politically vis-a-vis the Troika, but that even if they get most of what they want, their policies do not look likely to generate enough demand to pull Greece out of its ditch.

Like Ian Welsh I would argue for Greece to take a harder course, at least during negotiations and, if those fail, to really walk the walk:

Greek debt is at a level which is effectively impossible to pay off and has been made much, much worse by all the “aid packages” and “bailouts” given by their “fellow” Europeans. (Aka. they should have defaulted years ago.)As for the Euro, Greece can’t print it, and Greece will need to print money.

I worry that Syriza is serious about negotiating on the debt. There is essentially no chance the Troika (well, really, Germany) will give them acceptable terms on a writedown. Negotiations should be intended only to go on long enough to demonstrate that a good deal is not possible. While they are ongoing, the Greeks should be preparing for Grexit and repatriating all the resources they can.

Greece would become another pariah of the “western” world and Ian, correctly in my view, thinks that is a position in which it is not alone and which can be used to Greece’s favor:

The media is playing this as an anti-austerity vote, and it is. But voting anti-austerity for a country like Greece which can’t feed itself, has no oil, and doesn’t have a lot of industry, is one thing: not being austere is another. If the Greeks want a decent life again, they will have to take on some of the most powerful nations in the world and at least fight to a draw.Many nations are in the same boat as Greece is: Russia, Iran, Venezuela, Argentina. Greece needs to make the necessary alliances with such countries and it needs to align with the rising Chinese block.

Doing this requires a psychological step that Greeks may be unwilling to take: a recognition that their interests do not lie with Europe; an understanding that Europeans are willing to see them impoverished, homeless and dead. Greeks who are living in the past and think the EU is about prosperity for everyone in the EU need to learn otherwise.

Syriza might go the more radical path. If not it is likely to fail and then the door will be open for the hard right to take power and to start wars to divert the attention from the ever falling economy.

Source: Moon of Alabama

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Oceania Saker.

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Conversation: Prince Dimitri Schakhovskoy – on Crimea & Donbass – Silence is treason

Prince Dimitri Schakhovskoy – on Crimea & Donbass – Silence is treason from Oceania Saker on Vimeo.

A brief introductory note by Roobit (Translator):

Prince Dimitri Schakhovskoy, professor of the St. Sergius Institute of Orthodox Theology in Paris (Institut de Théologie Orthodoxe Saint-Serge), professor of the University of Upper Britanny at Rennes (université de Haute Bretagne), co-authored the Russian aristocracy in exile open letter of solidarity with Russia.

Prince Schakhovskoy / Chakhovskoï is a member of the upper layer of Russian aristocracy, he is a descendant of Ruriks or rather of the Rurik dynasty that stood at the roots of the Russian state, founded cities of Novgorod and Kiev and ruled first Kievan Rus and later the Grand Duchy of Moscow well into 17th century).

Transcription/Translation: Roobit

Production: Marina & Augmented Ether

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Oceania Saker.

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Aircraft Carrier Stennis Has Biggest Ordnance Onload Since 2010

Aviation Ordnanceman Mariko Armstrong, from Denver, takes inventory of BLU-111 500-pound bombs.

Aviation Ordnanceman Mariko Armstrong, from Denver, takes inventory of BLU-111 500-pound bombs.

Nearly two weeks ago, we were surprised to read on the Navy’s website that one of America’s prize aircraft carriers, CVN-74, John C. Stennis (whose crew is perhaps best known for the following awkward incident), as part of an operational training period in preparation for future deployments, just underwent not only its first ordnance onload since 2010, but, according to Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Jason Engleman, G-5 division’s leading chief petty officer, “the biggest ordnance onload we’ve seen.

From the Stennis’ blog:

 USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visited Naval Magazine (NAVMAG) Indian Island, the Navy’s primary ordnance storage and handling station on the West Coast, to onload six million pounds of ammunition, Jan. 13-15. “This is the biggest ordnance onload we’ve seen,” said Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Jason Engleman, G-5 division’s leading chief petty officer. “We haven’t had an onload since December 2010, and we are ready to show what this warship can do.”

The ship plans to take on two-thirds of its weight capacity during the three day evolution. Bombs, missiles and rounds will be onloaded by 1,400 crane lifts.

“The importance of the Indian Island visit is to provide ammunition for the ship’s defense, and assist with training during this underway,” said Lt. Cmdr. Steve Kashuba, Stennis’ ordnance handler officer.

The ordnance onload was an all-hands evolution and included Sailors from AIMD, air, navigation, safety, security, supply and medical departments. Sailors served as watchstanders, safety observers or ordnance handlers to ensure the evolution ran smoothly.

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Obamized Again!, by André Vltchek

In India

The Dude did it to me again! As my scheduled Air India flight from Kochi, Kerala, was attempting to make its final approach to Indira Gandhi International Airport, his much bigger horse, Air Force 1, was heading towards the nearby base.

It was exactly 10 o’clock in the morning. My eyes were infected after catching some mysterious bug, as I was told, a common Kerala disease. I was exhausted after writing countless essays (some directly related to the Dude), and what was ahead of me was yet another flight, this time to battered Srinagar in Kashmir.

My-God-Dude-will-rather-to-to-Saudi-Arabia-than-to-Taj-e1422238922206-450x600

But the Dude’s flying horse had priority. It always has!

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