Category Archives: Western Terrorism

Logistics 101: Where Does ISIS Get Its Guns?, by Tony Cartalucci

Tony Cartalucci has an amazing knack for not just identifying the deep pulse of the matter when it comes to regional conflicts but in effect he addresses them in a manner that simply checkmates the flawed hypocritical narrative which is floated around by the self proclaimed custodians of humanity, the dishonorable western governments.

Read his latest on the heart of the matter about the fake Caliphate that never was.

AE

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June 10, 2015 (Tony Cartalucci – NEO) – Since ancient times an army required significant logistical support to carry out any kind of sustained military campaign. In ancient Rome, an extensive network of roads was constructed to facilitate not only trade, but to allow Roman legions to move quickly to where they were needed, and for the supplies needed to sustain military operations to follow them in turn.

The other half of the war is logistics. Without a steady stream of supplies, armies no matter how strong or determined will be overwhelmed and defeated. What explains then ISIS' fighting prowess and the immense logitical networks it would need to maintain it?
The other half of the war is logistics. Without a steady stream of supplies, armies no matter how strong or determined will be overwhelmed and defeated. What explains then ISIS’ fighting prowess and the immense logitical networks it would need to maintain it?

In the late 1700’s French general, expert strategist, and leader Napoleon Bonaparte would note that, “an army marches on its stomach,” referring to the extensive logistical network required to keep an army fed, and therefore able to maintain its fighting capacity. For the French, their inability to maintain a steady supply train to its forces fighting in Russia, and the Russians’ decision to burn their own land and infrastructure to deny it from the invading forces, ultimately defeated the French.

Nazi Germany would suffer a similar fate when it too overextended its logical capabilities during its invasion of Russia amid Operation Barbarossa. Once again, invading armies became stranded without limited resources before being either cut off and annihilated or forced to retreat.

And in modern times during the Gulf War in the 1990’s an extended supply line trailing invading US forces coupled with an anticipated clash with the bulk of Saddam Hussein’s army halted what was otherwise a lighting advance many mistakenly believed could have reached Baghdad had there been the political will. The will to conquer was there, the logistics to implement it wasn’t.

The lessons of history however clear they may be, appear to be entirely lost on an either supremely ignorant or incredibly deceitful troupe of policymakers and news agencies across the West.

ISIS’ Supply Lines

The current conflict consuming the Middle East, particularly in Iraq and Syria where the so-called “Islamic State” (ISIS) is operating and simultaneously fighting and defeating the forces of Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and Iran, we are told, is built upon a logistical network based on black market oil and ransom payments.

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Myanmar: Meet Aung San Suu Kyi’s Saffron Mobs, by Tony Cartalucci

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Not unlike other US-backed “color revolutions” around the world, Myanmar’s “Saffron Revolution” is sold as an ultra-liberal pro-democracy, progressive movement, with one of the West’s most successful neo-colonial creations to date, Aung San Suu Kyi, portrayed and revered as a modern day, secular “saint” of neo-liberalism and Western democratic values. 

Underneath the pageantry and spin, however, is harbored ultra-right racism, bigotry, misogyny, and unhinged violence that if ever truthfully reported on, would end the “Saffron” wave, and spell the absolute end of both Suu Kyi’s political career and her legacy. 

Most recently Suu Kyi’s “Saffron” movement took to the streets, not to call for greater “freedom” or to defend “human rights,” but to condemn the government’s move toward giving hundreds of thousands of stateless Rohingya refugees citizenship.

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A place in between, by Dagmar Henn

Note: following Desecrated Shrines, this is the second eyewitness report about daily life in Novorussia sent to my by the Saker Community representative in Novorussia, Dagmar Henn, Team Leader German Saker Blog who has found the time to write this text while reorganizing the German blog.

The Saker

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A place in between

by Dagmar Henn

Oktiaborskii

It´s a cold, but sunny morning when we start for Oktiaborskii, another one of the prominently shelled quarters, like many others built around a mine of the same name. We drive to the last row of houses; just a few trees separate them from open fields, and just 500 m from the Ukrainian lines. Here we meet a delivery of food by the Vostok battalion. Planned or accidental? It´s not quite sure; here everything happens in a hurry, a few minutes on the spot, then it´s time to leave again.

No gas., no electricity.. in front of the second house we visit there’s an improvised stove, just a metal plate on a few stones under a tiny shed; there’s no lack of firewood, they collect the branches the shelling breaks off the trees. The facades are pockmarked from shrapnel. I remember those marks, in my childhood many buildings in Munich still wore them, dark dirty holes, but these are fresh, and the stone under the grey skin shines in a virgin white.

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Desacrated shrines, by Dagmar Henn

Note: this is the first article sent to me by the Saker Community representative in Novorussia, Dagmar Henn, from the German Saker Blog.  Dagmar has had a tough trip, with very little opportunity to write and only sporadic and slow Internet connections (this is, after all, a war zone).  I hope that this will be a first of a series of eyewitness reports by Dagmar about the reality of life in Novorussia today.

The Saker

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Desacrated shrines

by Dagmar Henn

We stop in front of a burnt-out church. This is Petrovsky, one of the areas most affected by Ukrainian shelling. The destruction seems completely accidental, a shelling lottery  that left ruins between untouched, immaculate buildings. This is a suburb with small single-floor houses built with red bricks, surrounded by green metal fences, squeezed between mines, factories and railroads. The whole landscape is dominated by the artificial hills, left by a century of mining, that still show their raw stoney faces.

This building was built in the 19th century as an administrative building, tells Alexandr Kolesnik, a member of the Novorosian parliament, later turned into a school and eventually transformed into a church, during perestroika. All the women in our group cover their heads. Stanislawska, one of our guards, rushes to the Turkish photographer to ask for the neckerchief around his neck, when shenotices [deletedthat’] I don’t have anything on me that could be used as concealment, so I end up entering the place with his grey, cotton scarf over my hair. What once was the central room, is now an open ruin. Black marks slide down from the gawping holes that used to be windows, and the smell of burnt wood lingers in the air, even though the fire died down weeks ago. The roof of the entrance still exists, only now as a ceiling of charcoal. This is Donetsks tiny version, of Coventry cathedral.

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Conversation: Historian William Blum on the Empire

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Oceania Saker.

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Those Who Collaborate with the West, by André Vltchek

It is much easier to rule over those people who have lost all their dignity.

There is no reason to fear resistance where cynical consumerism, lack of knowledge, and constant anxiety are shaping the behavioral patterns of a nation; of most of its citizens.

The West made an art form out of controlling the world. Its once rough and simple ‘divide and rule’ tactics have reached, with time, great virtuosity. What Richter, Rostropovich or Argerich did for the art of Western classical music, people like Brzezinski, Kissinger and Negroponte matched with their brilliance in the art of destruction and terror.

In today’s world, everything is upside down. Brothers fear brothers, guerilla fighters are made to spy on each other, and heroes who are fighting for the survival of the planet are labeled by Western regime as demagogues, strongmen or even terrorists.

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Conversation: I Stand with Russia

This is a really interesting effort being led by Sean Davis in the Asia Pacific region. He has taken a stand and we encourage you to take a stand for truth as well.

We initially reported on this at the beginning of the year here. And we are very happy to see that the initiative is continuing and growing!

Thank you Sean!

AE
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The Future of the Middle East, by Thierry Meyssan

For several months, Barack Obama has been trying to change US policy in the Middle East in order to eliminate the Islamic Emirate with the help of Syria. But he cannot do this, partly because he has been saying for years that President Assad must go, and secondly because his regional allies support the Islamic Emirate against Syria. However, things are slowly evolving so he should be able to do so soon. Thus, it appears that all States that supported the Islamic Emirate have ceased to do so, opening the way for a redistribution of the cards.

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The world awaits the conclusion of a comprehensive agreement between Washington and Tehran -under the ridiculous pretext of ending a military nuclear program that has not existed since the end of the war waged by Iraq (1980-1988) -. It would focus on the protection of Israel in exchange for recognition of Iranian influence in the Middle East and Africa.

However, this should only take effect after the Israeli elections of March 17, 2015. The supposed defeat of Netanyahu would renew ties between Washington and Tel Aviv and facilitate agreement with Tehran.

In this context, the US elite are trying to agree on future policy, while the European allies of the United States are preparing to align with what will be the new US policy.

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